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Thursday, December 19, 2013

Queen Anne Style Setee (Ca. 1930)

The Completed Settee

It has been a while since I have written about an upholstered piece so this post is devoted to the restoration of a Queen Anne style setee made sometime in the early part of the 20th century, I am guessing around 1930. At first glance, I thought that this might be a period Queen Anne settee. For a look at the restoration of a period sofa, follow this link:

Upon closer inspection of the underside of this settee, it was aparant that it was a modern piece made in the Queen Anne style. With this in mind, this was a well constructed settee with a nice shaped apron and down cushion. The interior wood used for the frame was poplar placing it's origin in America and  the wood used on the legs was mahogany.

The frame was in good shape but the webbing that held the springs in place had failed causing the seat to collapse. There were also several loose joints, mostly where the front legs attached to the frame. In addition, the fabric need to be replaced and the finish needed to be cleaned and spruced up a bit. Below are a few photos of the restoration of this beautiful settee.

This photo below shows the settee prior to restoration and upholstering.

As stated above, the webbing had failed on the underside of the settee as seen here. This was a bit of a blessing  because by removing it, it be came easier to access the frame from underneath and glue the loose joinery.

This photo shows the underside of the settee with the webbing removed. The front legs are also removed in this photo so that the old glue could be scraped form the joinery and the legs glued back onto the frame.

These next two photos show the frame being glued up. The legs are also being reattached to the frame.

After the repairs were complete, I cleaned the finish on the legs and added some french polish to bring back the finish. Once all of this was done, it was off to the upholsterer to be upholstered with the new fabric. Below are a few photos of the completed settee.

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